GhostShield ® Concrete Sealers & Densifiers

How to Seal a Walk-In Freezer

Published Monday 3rd of February 2014 // Updated Tuesday 7th of February 2017

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If you own a business or even a home with a walk-in freezer, chances are the floors are made of concrete. Concrete is an incredibly versatile and strong material that makes an excellent surface for environments as varied as bridge foundations to the floors of walk-in freezers. However, concrete also has some drawbacks. For all of its legendary strength and durability, it is susceptible to various structural and aesthetic problems over the course of its life.

One of the biggest threats can come from moisture damage. While most freezers do not leak regularly, there still is the potential threat of a broken freezer leading to pools of water throughout the floor. These pools of water can seep into unprotected concrete, entering into the vast maze of microscopic cracks and pores through the tiny pores on the surface of the slab. Once the water is in the concrete, it is nearly impossible to remove it. Fortunately, there exists an easy solution that is both efficient and cost-effective.

Concrete sealers are excellent products that will offer comprehensive protection for your freezer floors. They will help protect from water damage, but they also will help increase the concretes slip resistance and resistance to abrasions. However, you cannot just apply a concrete sealer to a freezer. First, you will need to turn off the freezer, allowing the room (and the surface of the concrete) to warm until it reaches a temperature of fifty degrees Fahrenheit. Once this temperature is reached, you can apply the sealer.

For a concrete floor in a freezer, your best choice is the Ghostshield Lithi-Tek 9500. The Lithi-Tek 9500 is a penetrating sealer whose particles of silicate will penetrate past the surface of the concrete to spread throughout the slab. Once inside the slab, the particles of sealant will react chemically with the minerals already present within the concrete. The result of these reactions will be a strengthening and densification of the concrete while simultaneously protecting the concrete from water damage.